Tag Archives: the amityville horror

Link Dump: #25

I found The Amityville Horror ’79 to be pretty underwhelming overall. I love haunted house movies, but this one wouldn’t fucking end, and it was basically the same series of events repeated endlessly. (The homeowners noticed something odd/violent, then shrugged it off.) Even Rod Steiger as a blind priest couldn’t save it. However, it did have a memorable moment where the black cat above bursts into sight, then disappears forever, as if to say, “KITTY!” (or maybe “Your house is haunted!) So keep that in mind if your house ever starts acting funny. Till then, here are some spooky haunted links:

  • Self-promotion alert! I recently reviewed a truly terrible independent horror movie called M.O.N. over at 366 Weird Movies. I sacrificed a whole hour of my life to watch this shit. Those are the breaks.
  • Moving Image Source has a great piece by Paul Brunick on Joseph McBride, film biography, and Orson Welles’s The Other Side of the Wind.
  • Also from Moving Image Source, we’ve got a great essay by Lindsay Peters on the sci-fi movies produced by the Left Bank filmmakers of the French New Wave! (I <3 Marker and Resnais’s sci-fi, so this piece gets my gold star. Kudos to Moving Image Source!)
  • Some Guy On the Net has a very deep understanding of what makes Toy Story 3 such a win: its depiction of love.
  • This “Famous Objects from Classic Movies” game is fun and addictive, and doesn’t always go with the obvious choices. Thankfully, it has an ending point!
  • If you haven’t glanced over these passive-aggressive emails sent by Donald Rumsfeld, regarding Condoleeza Rice, now is the time. It gives a very interesting (read: horrifying) impression of the people who ran this country for almost a decade.
  • I plan to talk about Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives in the near future. In the meantime, you can read two great interviews with its director, Apichatpong “Joe” Weerasethakul, at The A.V. Club and PopMatters. He sounds like a very affable, intelligent, and creative guy, which is no surprise considering his body of work.
  • The Horror Digest‘s Andre Dumas does one of my favorite things: questions received wisdom about film history. Specifically, she wrote about Thirteen Women (1932), starring The Thin Man‘s Myrna Loy, which could lay claim to being “the first slasher.”
  • Five words: David Lynch’s Dune coloring book.

Sadly, the strangest search terms we had all involved rape, so I decided not to post them. I’ll leave you with this: “nope cant find a single fuck.”

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