Tag Archives: yasujiro ozu

Link Dump: #85

Giant, person-devouring KITTY!

This week’s man-eating kitty is from the Sandman series, specifically the story “A Dream of a Thousand Cats” from the book Dream Country. Remember: Watch out, because with a single collective dream, cats could overturn the natural order again! And now, I give you our last set of links for 2012:

We’ll close off this year of Link Dumps with a pair of pussy-related search terms: “oozing foaming pussy vedios” (eww) and “two gey one pussy” (huh?). Yeah, I think “eww” and “huh?” just about sum up the Pussy Goes Grrr search term experience.

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Ozu/Hopper

I’ve been glancing over images from Yasujiro Ozu’s final film, An Autumn Afternoon (1962). His compositions tell all these terse, self-contained stories through line, color, and lighting—stories about middle-class life in postwar Japan, about all the pain (and incidental comedy) inherent in the very concept of “family.” Stories about disappointment, and the impossibility of happiness without first some compromise and heartbreak.

Between the placidity of Ozu’s frames and the frustrations of his characters, An Autumn Afternoon started reminding me of American painter Edward Hopper. As with Ozu, much of Hopper’s work consists of understated tragedy. Both men situate their characters in low-key milieux: modest rooms, taverns, street corners. And despite their gloomy implications, both Ozu’s swan song and Hopper’s paintings (like Chop Suey, above) abound with visual playfulness, never giving in entirely to misery.

“In the end, we spend our lives alone,” opines this drunken old man, a former schoolteacher from An Autumn Afternoon. “All alone.” Both of these artists, separated by decades and the Pacific Ocean, single out solitude as a constant of the human condition. Their figures are enshrouded by darkness, and that darkness is offset by harsh lighting elsewhere in these frames. This old man—in the twilight of his life, left with nothing but a noodle shop and a resentful daughter—is downcast, wistful, at rest. Same goes for this lonely woman in cloche and coat, pausing over a cup of coffee in Hopper’s Automat. They’ve turned their emotions inward and resigned themselves to loneliness.

Each of these shots is a study of body language, of the gestures and poses through which melancholy manifests itself. Poor Michiko (Shima Iwashita), informed that her would-be beau is already engaged, slouches silently just like the half-dressed traveler in Hopper’s Hotel Room. Their contexts are totally different: Michiko’s suppressing a wave of emotions in front of her father and brother, whereas Hopper’s subject is in the thrall of a more abstract lethargy. But they share the same hands-down, head-down posture and inscrutably blank face. Both Ozu and Hopper integrate these physical expressions of sadness into the mise-en-scène, letting the disappointment of their characters ripple out across the frame.

[Hopper paintings courtesy of “Bert Christensen’s Cyberspace Gallery.”]

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Link Dump: #31

Some day, and that day may never come, I will call upon you to pet a kitty for me. But until that day, consider this set of awesome Internet links a gift on this Friday. This is a Link Dump you can’t refuse, because we finally used the kitty from the opening scene of The Godfather.

  • Personal plug: as previously mentioned, Ashley’s final project in her Graphic Memoir class was writing and illustrating a 10-page graphic memoir. All the students’ stories were put together and printed to create Pulling Teeth: Abington Stories (which you can totally buy right here)!
  • If you like The Film Experience’s “First and Last” series, you’ll love David Bordwell’s latest piece, all about beginnings and endings in films like Snow White, The Wild One, and Broken Blossoms.
  • Really, honestly, what’s better than the intersection of film and comics? Adrian Tomine is helping to raise money for Japan by selling gorgeous prints of his DVD cover art for two Ozu films. Both Ozu and Tomine are all about perfectly composed frames, so it’s a match made in visual art heaven.
  • 12 minutes of Wilhelm screams!
  • News stories don’t come much more bizarre than this one about urine and cough drops from Orlando.
  • FreakyTrigger has an image-packed review of Russ Meyer’s Mudhoney. (They give a trigger warning, so I will too.)
  • Call for creativity! If you’re part of a marginalized group, contribute to this zine; it’s for a final project and a cool opportunity to have your voice heard.
  • Cinema Enthusiast has an awesome list of “10 Creepy Villains from Children’s Films,” with some obscure and Dahl-tastic choices.
  • We here at Pussy Goes Grrr are grammar fanatics so this article about 11 Grammatically Incorrect Movie Titles tickles us just the right way. (Seriously, lol!)
  • I (Ashley) used to be an avid fanfic writer (and sometimes I’ll get a wild hair and start a completely random fanfic now at 22 years of age), so the inevitable “Fuck Yeah, Fanfic Flamingo” is so delightful to me I can’t even explain it. Many a fanfic reader/writer will enjoy it as well.

As usual, this week saw about a zillion different pornographic search terms with “pussy” in them. Three of the weirdest were “kids 10 and up getting pussy” (yuck/yikes), “the most profound and wide pussy” (Zen pussy?), and of course, “why don’t wives give up the pussy,” which makes “pussy” sound like the remote control a couple is fighting over.

I enjoyed the very dull search for “bland, empty, generically,” as well as the open-ended “we could have saved the” (what?! what?!). But the cake was taken by the poorly punctuated, redundant, and hilarious “wow ,it’s very sexy ,sex shopping ,i like it very much.” I like it very much too.

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